Advantages of Employee Ambassadorship for Your Company

Employees play a vital role in any company, and many employers understand the value of having employees who act as brand advocates. These advocates can effectively promote the company's success and achievements. This article explores the process of establishing an employee advocacy program and the potential benefits that employers can gain.

4 mins read
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25 Mar, 2024

To what extent do you believe your employees would willingly and independently support your company? How invested do you think they are in the business beyond their salary and benefits? Employers use employee advocacy programs to strengthen relationships with employees and find answers to these questions.

What is the difference between an employee benefits program and the ambassadorship program?

An employee benefits program provides various perks to employees as part of their benefits package. These perks include gym memberships, health and life insurance, retirement plans, paid time off, and more.

An employee ambassador program empowers employees to be brand advocates and representatives by recognizing them in various ways. This program motivates employees to promote the company's values, products, and services through social media, events, and community outreach.

While both programs aim to enhance employee satisfaction and engagement, they differ in their focus and objectives.

What does employee ambassadorship mean?

Employee ambassadorship is when companies use staff members to promote their brand and improve their reputation. These selected employees have a genuine passion for promoting the positive aspects of the company.

They typically do this through participation in events and engagement on social media platforms. Their goal is to encourage interaction and improve the company's reputation. Compensation for working beyond regular hours may include monetary rewards or additional privileges and benefits.

An employee ambassador program is great for those who like social media, are creative, and feel comfortable online and offline. Ambassadors have the opportunity to showcase their unused skills, uncovering qualities that may contribute to their career progression.

What's involved in employee ambassadorship?

The initial stage involves identifying staff members who demonstrate a true enthusiasm for the organization and its values. Consider factors such as communication skills, leadership qualities, and a positive mindset.

Give the project to HR. They will explain the program to staff and talk to potential candidates.

Remember the importance of diversity and inclusion within your team. Having employee representatives from different backgrounds is crucial. Additionally, be prepared to provide support to those with specific needs or requirements.

Employee screening: assessing online and offline activity

Check the person's social media to see if they would be a good online representative for your brand. Someone active on LinkedIn with a big network can create a lot of interest in your business. However, do not overlook individuals who are less active or have fewer connections. A well-placed post from them can be just as valuable as one shared in a busy stream of posts.

If you believe someone would be better at representing the company in person, ask if they're interested in doing so. The goal is to select individuals who can truly represent the company using their unique strengths and personality.

Provide training, establish guidelines, and offer incentives

Ensure that ambassadors receive comprehensive training on the company's background, values, and key messages. Equip them with effective communication skills and tools to represent the organization well in various situations. Conduct regular meetings to keep them updated on industry and company news. Maintain open communication with your internal communications/marketing team to avoid conflicting messages.

Create opportunities for ambassadors to share their experiences and knowledge with both internal and external audiences. This can include internal newsletters, company recognition, industry events, social media platforms, and regular employee meetings. Encourage ambassadors to actively participate in relevant industry events and conferences.

Recognize the efforts of ambassadors through appreciation programs and rewards. This motivates ambassadors and inspires other employees to aim for the role, creating a positive cycle of involvement.

Implementing employee ambassadorship programs

Seek support from upper management for the ambassadorship program. Managers and directors may need to involve themselves in or respond to ambassador actions, both online and offline. This creates a positive environment and highlights the importance of the program.

Establish clear goals for the program, whether it's boosting employee morale, enhancing brand image, or increasing social media engagement. Develop metrics to measure the program's success and make necessary adjustments.

Regularly gather feedback from ambassadors to adapt the program to the changing needs and challenges of the organization. Encourage input from employees regarding their thoughts on ambassadorship tasks and suggestions for improvement.

Collaborate closely with the HR department to align the program with existing employee engagement efforts. HR teams can help manage the impact of additional ambassador tasks on employees' regular workload. The ambassadorship role should not negatively affect an employee's well-being. If at any point they are unable to handle their responsibilities, it should not harm their professional reputation.

What are the long-term benefits for employers?

Ambassadorship programs enhance company culture, improve the work environment, attract potential employees, and are cost-effective compared to other marketing strategies. They also provide the advantage of authenticity. Employee support is crucial for achieving company recognition, increased job applications, leadership in sustainability, or successful promotion of charitable events.

If you want to attract employee advocates or join a progressive company, contact our expert consultants now.

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