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8 ways to get a job with no experience
2 mins read
  1. Article

8 ways to get a job with no experience

You need experience to get a job, but you need a job to get experience... How do you get your foot on the ladder? Whether you're fresh out of education or looking to follow a new career path, feeling like you don't have the experience to land that first job can be frustrating. So, here are some of the ways you can achieve the (seemingly) impossible and get a job with no experience!Address the issueIf you lack experience, don't try to brush over the fact. A cover letter is the perfect place to address any gaps in your CV, so use the opportunity to address any concerns the employer might have. Then...Focus on what you DO haveExperience is important, but so is your attitude to work, your personality, your understanding of the company and its activity, motivation, resilience, ideas for the future - the list is endless, so don't get too hung up on any one thing.Find experience you didn't know you hadBefore you decide you don't have the experience, make absolutely sure this is true. Think back over your past jobs and try to draw links between the experience you need and the experience you have. Remember: it needn't be exactly the same; the key word to keep in mind is relevant. If you've organised a meeting or answered the phones, that's admin experience. If you've set up a Facebook page or created a flier, that's marketing. Think outside the box!Create some experienceDo some voluntary work, work experience, or an internship."Don't be afraid to start from scratch. Getting your foot in the door is crucial, and you never know what might come next."But (as above) make sure the experience you're getting is relevant. If you're still taking your first steps, don't waste time with unrelated work, especially if it's unpaid!Demonstrate your intentIf you really want to get into a particular industry, make sure that people know about it. Get involved in relevant industry discussions on LinkedIn, join relevant groups, attend networking and careers events, and make sure you make your enthusiasm public.NetworkIf you don't have the desired level of experience, you need to be trustworthy. Network, and get your contacts to recommend you. Employers are more likely to overlook the gap in your experience if you come with a recommendation from someone they can trust. Find out more about effectiveness networking.Apply speculativelyIf you only apply for advertised jobs, you're going to be assessed against set criteria. Apply speculatively to companies that interest you, demonstrate you've done your research, and ask if there's any opportunities for you as you're looking to break into the industry. If the answer is no, ask if you can apply again in 6 months, and find out what you can do in the meantime to improve your chances.Get an interviewIf nothing else, just focus on getting an interview. This is easily the best situation in which to address your lack of experience and the best place to sell your other strengths. Remember: whether you can do the job is just one factor the interviewer is considering, alongside your motivation, and your fit with the company culture. Ace both of these and who knows... 2 out of 3 might be enough!

Five things you need to know about pre-employment credit checks
2 mins read
  1. Article

Five things you need to know about pre-employment credit checks

​It’s becoming more common for employers to perform credit checks on candidates. The number of workers being rejected for jobs because of bad debt is on the rise, and has become the most common reason potential employees fail their vetting test. To understand the what and the why, we ask Director of Reed Screening, Keith Rosser, five key questions about pre-employment credit checks.1. What is a pre-employment credit check?“There are a range of checks you can carry out on a candidate, and these inform an important part of the recruitment process. They help employers to understand the financial situation of a candidate – to help them reduce the risk of employee fraud – as well as helping to comply with law.”2. Why should employers perform credit checks?“Many employers would argue that assessing a candidate’s financial situation reduces the risk of fraud being committed. There’s a school of thought that the ‘bad debtor’ classification indicates the person may commit fraud in future. This is challenging as there are many cases where people with no debt go on to commit fraud. While predominately used in the financial sector, an increasing number of employers in other industries are performing pre-employment credit checks, such as healthcare and engineering.”"The number of people rejected for jobs because of bad debt has grown 7% since 2016."3. What is looked at when performing a credit check? “A typical pre-employment credit check will check public and private databases for a candidate’s Court Judgements, bankruptcies, voluntary arrangements, decrees and administration orders, as well as the candidate’s electoral roll registration to confirm their current address. However, it should also be taken into consideration that debt levels across the UK have risen because of economic factors largely out of the candidate’s control.”4. What can a candidate do to aid their credit screening when they apply for a job?  “Candidates can check their credit reports easily online, but for many, it won’t have crossed their mind that an employer might check. Make them aware of the fact and tactfully advise that they should be keeping an eye on their financial health with simple things like making sure they’re meeting monthly payments in a timely fashion. As there is no standardised approach to pre-employment credit checks, requirements can change between companies – which is why we are lobbying for a universal approach.”"Candidates can easily check their credit with free reports readily available online."5. What services do Reed provide? “Reed is one of the largest pre-employment screening businesses. As part of a commitment to reducing risks and with our roots firmly in recruitment, Reed uses market knowledge and expertise to recommend a background screening package that best suits the needs of your business.”Get in touch today to find out how our additional services can benefit your recruitment strategy.

Second interview questions to ask candidates
3 mins read
  1. Article

Second interview questions to ask candidates

​The second interview may seem like there is a light at the end of the tunnel after weeks of recruitment to find someone for an opening at your business. Your previous interviews have removed candidates who don't fit the role, which leaves only a handful of people, one of whom you most certainly will be working with in the near future. But working out who this person should be is often decided by running a second interview.The second interview is an important comparison task for you and your team and therefore the questions you use need to give you some real insight into the person you may employ. Yet, just as in your first round of interviews, asking the right questions can be crucial in order to understand if a candidate is suitable for the role.Although there are never a fixed set of questions to ask in the second interview, here are our selection of questions for employers to ask which will hopefully allow you to understand a candidate more fully before making a decision on who to hire.​Second interview questions to ask candidates:What are your personal long term career goals?The way your candidate answers this question will give you an insight into where they would position themselves within your company in the long term. If they answer directly referencing your business then they are thinking of remaining within the company for the future and will work hard towards achieving their own career goals whilst working hard for the business. It also allows for you to gauge their personality as their honesty will be very important when making a final decision about who to hire.Do you have any questions about the business or the role since your first interview?This gives your candidate the opportunity to ask questions they may not have thought of during the nerve-wracking first interview. This is good for both of you as it allows you to see how much they have prepared for this interview but also gives them the chance to ask the really good questions they probably thought of on the journey home from the first time they met you.What skills do you think are needed for this role?This does not directly ask them what they could offer but questions their ability to comprehend the role and think critically. It then invites them to state the skills they have and how they compare with what they think is needed.Why would you not be suitable for this role?This asks your candidate to think about problem and resolution - how they would overcome any professional issues they may have in the role. How positive they are in answering this question gives you an idea for their own motivation for achievement.What changes would you make at this company?This invites your candidate to analyse the business constructively from the research they may or may not have undertaken prior to the interview. It gives you the opportunity to see how they would deal with negative questions and how they would positively bring about change. Good answers could include more specific training or offering more responsibility to certain members of the team.How soon would you be able to start this role?This is quite a typical question but an important one as the logistics of taking on new staff can be an administrative nightmare. It can be purely comparative as some candidates will be able to start sooner than others. It also shows their commitment to their current roles and how professional they are in their conduct. If they mention leaving their current position without serving notice they may do this to your business as well.Ultimately, good questions are essential in establishing who will be best for your business. Hopefully, having met with a candidate for the second time, you will have a much better understanding of their skills, capabilities and – most importantly – whether or not they would be a good fit for your business.