How to prepare for an interview presentation

In a competitive job market, more challenging interview styles such as presentation interviews are becoming more and more common.

3 mins read
Interview Presentations

over 2 years ago

Particularly for executive level positions, a presentation stage can be an integral part of the short-listing process.

Many employers opt for a presentation interview as it gives a better overview of your general aptitude when compared to (or combined with) a traditional question and answer interview. The presentation is your opportunity to showcase your knowledge, experience and communication skills as well as your general organisation and diligence.

Here are our tips on how you can ensure you deliver the best interview presentation possible.

Preparing your presentation for an interview

  • Keep each slide short and significant, aiming for no more than 10 slides. This ensures the information you deliver is memorable and will help you to stand out from other interviewees

  • Use a range of formats to help illustrate your points. Include graphs, statistics, diagrams, video clips, and images to help break up large volumes of text and maintain the attention of the interviewers

  • Include quotes from industry leaders and/or research pieces. This helps give your points authority and demonstrate your commercial awareness

  • Incorporate company colours or fonts in the design of your presentation. This will show you’ve done your research and highlight your brand awareness

  • Check spelling and grammar thoroughly – small mistakes can really undermine the content of your presentation

Presenting tips

  • Present confidently and enthusiastically. Remember to speak clearly, make eye contact and use open body language

  • Practice, practice, practice. Ensure you are well rehearsed so that you are familiar with the structure and are able to deliver your presentation smoothly

  • Arrive early to give yourself time to set up the presentation and settle any nerves

  • Get comfortable with PowerPoint and presentation equipment. Make sure you know how to work the projector, visual screens or remote control before you begin to avoid any awkward stumbles or pauses

  • Have access to multiple sources of your presentation. Email the file to yourself and the recruiter, bring a copy on a USB stick and bring printed handouts. This way you are covered if anything goes wrong with the file you’re intending to use

  • Stay within the allocated time. If you have not been given a guidance on length, aim for the 10 minute mark. Time your presentation when you are practising to make sure it will fit within your allowed time slot. If you need to reduce the content of your presentation, cut out the least relevant or weakest points

  • Be prepared to adapt. You may have practiced your presentation in a certain way, but the interviewer might not respond accordingly. Be prepared to be stopped for questions or further discussion unexpectedly

10 minute interview presentation template

Below is an example for the structure of your interview presentation. Use this as a baseline and adapt or reorder where appropriate based on the task you have been set by the interviewer.

Slide 1:Introduction – Reiterate the objectives you have been set and lay out the structure of your presentation so that the interviewers know what to expect

Slide 2:About you – Detail your professional experience, skills and working style

Slide 3:Company history – Give a brief summary of the company history, any milestones or awards

Slides 4-7:Answering the brief – Give your responses to questions you’ve been asked to answer, the benefits and limitations of your suggestions

Slide 8:Question and answers – Include a slide titled ‘questions and answers’ as a cue to pause for interaction

Slide 9:Conclusion – Sum up the key points you have made, reach a decision and explain your reasoning

Slide 10:Personal achievements – End the interview on a high with a brief slide on achievements that show you will succeed in the role

Taking these steps should help you to succeed in your presentation interview.

You may also be interested in

Employee monitoring: a guide to best practices
1 mins read

Employee monitoring: a guide to best practices

Employee monitoring can help ensure productivity and accountability among employees, as managers can track their work progress and identify areas where improvement is needed. Monitoring enhances data security by detecting and preventing unauthorised access or data breaches and additionally, it enables you to adhere to regulatory and compliance requirements, reducing legal risks. 

The key thing to remember is that workplace surveillance is perfectly acceptable, as long as you can legally justify your reasons, and it is always better to be ‘overt’, not ‘covert’.  

A report shows that despite normality returning to working life post-pandemic, demand for employee surveillance software is 49% above 2019 levels. 

Our eBook, ‘Employee monitoring: a guide to best practices’, provides insight from top experts in the field including:    

Keith Rosser, Director of Group Risk and Reed Screening, Reed 

Hayfa Mohdzaini, Senior Research Adviser, CIPD

 By downloading this eBook, you will discover:   

  • What employee monitoring is 

  • Whether it's needed for your business

  • Considerations for introducing workplace monitoring  

  • The benefits and drawbacks  

  • Potential impact of surveillance on the workforce 

  • Your duties as a responsible employer 

“Monitoring software that employees see as intrusive and unnecessary is more likely to erode mutual trust in the employment relationship. Employers need to show how using monitoring software can benefit employees, while respecting their privacy.” -Hayfa Mohdzaini, Senior Research Adviser, CIPD.

Workplace monitoring: guidance for your organisation
2 mins read
  1. Article

Workplace monitoring: guidance for your organisation

​In the past, workplace monitoring was relatively simplistic: employers relied on visual supervision and basic timekeeping systems, and the concept of privacy was limited.

Fast forward to the digital age. Employee monitoring has reached new levels of sophistication and become common practice for employers seeking to boost productivity, enhance security, and ensure compliance with regulations.

Improved productivity and deeper insights

With the advancement of technology, including GPS tracking, computer monitoring software, and biometric identification systems, surveillance can provide employers with detailed insights into employee activities and performance.

One of the key benefits of employee monitoring is the ability to track and improve productivity levels. By monitoring employees' activities, employers can identify inefficiencies, analyse workflow processes, and provide targeted feedback to enhance performance. This data-driven approach allows companies to optimise their operations, allocate resources effectively, and ultimately improve their bottom line.

Monitoring can also help employers identify and address issues such as time theft, excessive breaks, and unauthorised activities in the workplace. With real-time monitoring tools, employers can detect irregularities and take corrective actions promptly, therefore improving accountability and integrity among employees.

Employee monitoring can also aid in compliance with regulations and industry standards. By keeping a close eye on electronic communications, websites visited, and files accessed, employers can ensure that employees adhere to data protection laws, maintain confidentiality, and comply with company policies. This proactive approach minimises the risk of data breaches and security incidents and also protects the company from potential legal liabilities.

Balancing surveillance and ethics

Despite the clear advantages of employee monitoring, it is crucial for organisations to approach this practice with sensitivity and respect for staff privacy. As a matter of course, employers should establish clear policies regarding monitoring practices, communicate openly with employees about the purpose and scope of monitoring, and ensure transparency in the use of monitoring tools.

Prioritise the protection of sensitive employee data by implementing robust security measures, restricting access to monitoring data, and complying with data protection regulations such as GDPR. These considerations can ease employees’ minds about any surveillance and even instil appreciation for such measures. After all, workplace security is in everyone’s best interests.

Download our best practice guide to employee monitoring

Our eBook, ‘Employee monitoring: a guide to best practices’ provides insight into how employers might best integrate employee monitoring into their organisation, and considerations for what the impact may be on employees. With opinion from thought leaders, it addresses everything from pre-employment checks to the tracking tech that might be right your organisation.

Looking to hire top talent for your organisation or to find your next dream role? Get in touch with one of our specialist consultants today.

How to become a marketing executive
3 mins read
  1. Article

How to become a marketing executive

Are you wondering how to become a marketing executive? This article provides you with all the information you need to start your career journey.

What is a marketing executive?

A marketing executive is a key member of a marketing team and is often responsible for developing and implementing marketing campaigns to promote the company's products or services. They work closely with other teams, such as sales, product development, and advertising, to ensure cohesive messaging and strategic alignment. Marketing executives analyse market trends, conduct market research, and utilize various channels, including digital platforms, traditional media, and events, to reach target audiences and achieve marketing objectives.

A marketing executive career is best suited to those with a creative mindset, strong communication skills, and a passion for strategic planning. Adaptability, analytical thinking, and the ability to thrive in a fast-paced environment are also crucial attributes for success in this role.

Types of marketing executive

Marketing executives can specialize in various areas, including:

Digital marketing executive

Focuses on online channels such as paid social media, email marketing, search engine optimization (SEO), and pay-per-click (PPC) advertising.

Brand marketing executive

Concentrates on building and managing the brand’s identity, including brand messaging, visual assets, and brand consistency across all touchpoints.

Content marketing executive

Creates and distributes valuable, relevant content to attract and engage target audiences, often through blog posts, articles, videos, and infographics.

Product marketing executive

Works closely with product development teams to understand product features, benefits, and target markets, and develops marketing strategies to drive product adoption and sales.

What do you need to become a marketing executive

Here are the marketing executive qualifications that you will need to obtain for the role:

Academic qualifications

While a degree in marketing, business, or a related field is beneficial, practical experience and demonstrable skills are often equally important, so a degree is not always necessary.

Professional qualifications

Many employers look for candidates with internship experience, relevant certifications (such as Google Analytics or HubSpot), and a strong understanding of marketing principles and techniques.

Skills and experience

Key skills for marketing executives include creativity, strategic thinking, attention to detail, and proficiency in digital marketing tools and platforms.

Marketing executive role and responsibilities

What does a marketing executive do? Well, the role varies depending on the organization and industry, but marketing executive responsibilities typically include:

  • Developing and executing marketing strategies to meet business objectives

  • Conducting market research to identify target audiences, market trends, and competitors

  • Creating compelling content and promotional materials across various channels

  • Managing social media accounts and engaging with followers

  • Analysing campaign performance and optimizing strategies based on data insights

  • Collaborating with cross-functional teams, such as sales, to ensure alignment and integration of marketing efforts

Marketing executives typically work standard office hours, although overtime may be required during busy periods or when deadlines are approaching. Salaries for marketing executives in Singapore vary depending on factors such as location, experience, and industry sector.

Entry-level positions may start at around $3,000 per month, while experienced and senior marketing executives can earn around $4,000 per month.

Marketing executive career prospects

As businesses continue to prioritize digital marketing and data-driven decision-making, the demand for skilled marketing executives is expected to remain high. Experienced professionals may advance to senior management positions, from senior marketing executive, content marketing manager, head of digital marketing, up to marketing director. Continuing education, staying updated on industry trends, and networking within the marketing community can enhance career prospects and open new opportunities.

In conclusion, becoming a marketing executive requires a combination of education, practical experience, and essential skills. With the right qualifications and dedication, aspiring marketers can embark on a rewarding career path with ample opportunities for growth and advancement.

If you are looking for a marketing or business support professional, or seeking a new role yourself, get in touch with one of our specialist consultants today.